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Monique Turenne

Slowly, but surely, Turenne's team moves towards getting the truth into the open

  • No disclosure has been given to Turenne and her counsel, Greg Brodsky
  • Crown prosecutor Frayer doesn't have any disclosure, either
  • In Extradition proceedings, the International Assistance Group has acted as liaison between the Florida authorities and the Canadian government.
  • This group of federally paid lawyers hold in their hands all the information which would show that Turenne's Florida indictment was based on information sworn by Winnipeg cop Loren Schinkel

Feds accused of derailing extradition appeal
Lawyer says requests for documents refused

Monique Turenne

Lawyers for a Winnipeg woman, awaiting extradition to Florida on charges she murdered her husband in 1996, say the painstaking process is further delayed by the Canadian government. Greg Brodsky, who acts for Monique Turenne, said the federal Justice Department has repeatedly refused to hand over key documents involving an appeal of his client's case.

The Manitoba Court of Appeal will hear a motion in February on the disclosure issue, which is further delaying the never-ending legal saga.

"We are trying to get this going. We are not trying to delay," said Brodsky.

Turenne has steadfastly denied any role in the eight-year-old murder of her husband, Canadian air force major David Turenne, who was found beaten to death in the driveway of their Panama City, Fla., bungalow.

He was on assignment with the U.S. Air Force at the time.

Turenne was ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999. Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both Manitoba Court of Appeal and then-federal justice minister Anne McLellan.

After more than three years of uncertainty, former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March.

The order was granted after Cauchon received written confirmation Turenne would not face the death penalty if convicted, a requirement recently upheld in a ruling of the Supreme Court of Canada.

Turenne's lawyers said they would move immediately to appeal both Cauchon's decision and the original extradition order to Manitoba Court of Appeals.

But Brodsky said the appeal process has been derailed by interference from the Canadian government.

He has been refused access to certain documents pertaining to the police investigation of Turenne's death and communication between the Manitoba, Canadian and American governments, according to his motion.

Brodsky has argued the federal Justice Department should have assumed jurisdiction for the case because the victim was a member of the Canadian military and because his wife was charged with the crime.

He demanded Turenne be tried in Canada, an assertion Cauchon rejected.

David Turenne was found beaten to death in the driveway of their suburban bungalow on February

Police were unable to find any evidence pointing to the murderer or motive for the crime. No murder weapon has been found.

A week after David Turenne's body was found, and acting on a tip from an acquaintance of Monique's, police arrested retired U.S. Air Force Sgt. Ralph Crompton and charged him with the murder.

Crompton, now serving life in a Florida prison for the murder, said during his trial he was lured to the Turenne home on the night of the murder, but it was Monique who bludgeoned David Turenne with a hammer.


Long delay in extradition case blamed on Ottawa

WINNIPEG -- Lawyers for a Winnipeg woman accused of murdering her husband in Florida in 1996 say the extradition process is being unnecessarily delayed by the Canadian government.

Greg Brodsky, who acts for Monique Turenne, said the federal Justice Department has repeatedly refused to hand over key documents involving an appeal of his client's case.

The Manitoba Court of Appeal is to hear a motion in February on the disclosure issue, which is further delaying an already lengthy legal saga.

"We are trying to get this going," said Brodsky.

"We are not trying to delay."

Turenne has steadfastly denied any role in the murder of her husband David, a Canadian air force major, who was found beaten to death outside their bungalow in Panama City, Fla.

He was on assignment with the U.S. air force at the time.

Turenne was ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999.

Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both the Manitoba Court of Appeal and the federal justice minister.

After more than three years of uncertainty, former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March. The order was granted after Cauchon received written confirmation that Turenne would not face the death penalty if convicted, a requirement recently upheld in a Supreme Court of Canada ruling.

Turenne's lawyers said they would move immediately to appeal both Cauchon's decision and the original extradition order to the Manitoba Court of Appeal.

But Brodsky said the appeal process has been derailed by interference from the Canadian government.

His motion asserts he has been refused access to certain documents pertaining to the police investigation of David Turenne's death and communication between the Manitoba, Canadian and U.S. governments.


Ralph Crompton

July, 2003: Ralph Crompton's appeal has been denied, the decision based largely on the fact that he is an incorrigible liar. It was Crompton who implicated Monique Turenne. Crompton also raised the matter of "Diablo," which lends great credibility to Monique Turenne's claim that she and her son Danny were terrorized by a "pony-tailed man" the night of the murder. She did not reveal this information to Schinkel during his ruthless interrogation because she was genuinely scared of this man who told her to keep her mouth shut or he would kill her children. Although that part of the case is cold, there are still avenues of investigation which would almost surely lead to the interjurisdictional underworld inhabited by David Turenne. (Those jurisdictions include several U.S. states, Quebec and possibly other Canadian provinces and the military on both sides of the border.)


Disinformation about her was in the community where she lives before she knew it existed:

  • an "affair" she can prove never happened, concocted by the equivalent of a jailhouse informant (a man facing conviction and death and possibly innocent himself);
  • rumours she stood to gain huge sums of money as a motive when in fact she returned to the estate the $128.000 (minus legal fees) and has received only $409 a month from Canada Pension Plan for the six years since David's death.
  • Reports of her candid statements about her marital troubles distorted into wishing him dead
  • Reports she had tried to get a gun from a source who could be easily impeached. (Guns can be purchased at many stores in Panama City.)

Monique Turenne has been indicted by a grand jury in Florida on a circumstantial case which she has no opportunity to answer.


The US. media continue to run with the lies told by convicted murderer Ralph Crompton. There was blood evidence against him. He has been caught in dozens of lies.

Combine his lies with the lies of Winnipeg cop Loren Schinkel and maybe we have a Guiness world record for the two biggest liars ever involved in attempting to frame an innocent person.

There is not now nor ever has been a single shred of evidence that Monique Turenne killed her husband . . . except the testimony of these two liars.

The Panama City newspapers have also played into the hands of Monique Turenne's greedy in-laws who have repeatedly stated on talk-radio and to the gutter press that Monique Turenne profitted from her husband's death.

In fact, Pat Turenne, as executrix of the will, is having some trouble accounting for some of the funds and the fact that she did not settle claimes against the estate in timely fashion.