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Monique Turenne

Extradition order signed for Winnipeg woman

Monique Turenne

WINNIPEG - A Winnipeg woman says she's glad the federal justice minister has ordered her extradition. Monique Turenne is accused of murdering her husband while living in Florida seven years ago. She believes an appeal of the extradition order will allow her to clear her name. "Finally! Finally. Now what's the next step?" Turenne told CBC.

David Turenne was found bludgeoned to death in Panama City, Florida seven years ago. A man named Ralph Crompton is already serving a sentence for first-degree murder in his death. Crompton claims to have been Monique Turenne's lover. The Winnipeg woman denies this.

Turenne also claims the delays have kept her from proving she's innocent.

"We didn't stall this. The minister of justice basically had the file for four years. Why didn't he make a decision before now?"

Jim Appleman, the Florida prosecutor who convicted Crompton, says if Turenne has concerns about a fair trial, there are laws to protect her.

"One of the things that is available in this particular area is that fact that if there's been too much pre-trial publicity concerning the case, the judge has the right to move the case to another area in Florida where there has been no publicity."

Florida has given assurances it will not seek the death penalty. In the meantime, Turenne's lawyer, Greg Brodsky, says he will appeal the decision to extradite his client.


Extradition Order comes down

TURENNE EXTRADITION COMES DOWN: Mar. 3, 2003 Monique Turenne's ex-inlaws and ex have been stirring things up in her fight to be tried in Canada so she can clear her name of murder charges in Florida. The Charles Adler show on CJOB, and which is syndicated across the country, raised her case and the old slanders on Friday. No one attempted to contact Turenne for her side of the story -- the truth -- which is on this site. Call CJOB and ask them to tell Monique's side of the story: 1-800-665-2202. In Winnipeg, 780-6868.

The lies continue to be carried. Monique Turenne never had an affair with Ralph Crompton. She did not send her husband out to get Midol in order to send him to a trap so Crompton could bludgeon him to death. Monique Turenne does not use Midol. These particular lies came from the desperate and imaginative mind of Ralph Crompton after he was already linked to the crime. It is possible that Crompton himself was not involved in the murder but was bullied into a confession.

It is also a lie that Monique Turenne and her lawyer Greg Brodsky are trying to stall justice. They want justice, not a fraudulant court. They simply want full disclosure from the U.S. authorities so they can properly present their case against the U.S. extradition order.

The request that Turenne be tried in Canada is eminently reasonable since both she and her murdered husband are Canadian. At trial in Canada Monique Turenne could bring forth evidence -- discovered after his death -- that he had underworld connections and that he was in debt to unsavoury people.

As a citizen of Canada Monique Turenne deserves to be tried in her own country where proper evidence can be brought forth. Another Winnipeger unjustly charged with murder, Thomas Sophonow has already paved the way to ensure that full disclosure is a part of any trial.

Susan English and Pat Turenne have told many lies to cover their greedy tracks as they hope to benefit from their brother's estate by putting Monique Turenne out of the picture. We will continue our coverage of this shameful story where the Winnipeg police, the Florida district attorneys and the media have cooperated with greedy relatives to destroy the reputation of an innocent woman and her children.
-- Sheila Steele


Extradition order signed for Canadian murder suspect

A Canadian minister of justice has signed an extradition order for woman charged with murdering her husband, an officer in the Canadian Air Force stationed in Florida, seven years ago.

Monique Turenne, 46, returned to Winnipeg, Manitoba, before she was indicted with first-degree murder in the beating death of Canadian Air Force Maj. David Turenne on the lawn their Panama City home.

The 42-year-old victim was serving with a U.S.-Canadian air defense unit at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base.

Turenne has been fighting an extradition order approved by a Canadian judge in 1999. Bay County ruled out the death penalty so the Canadian government would consider extradition.

A minister of justice signed the order Tuesday, but the Manitoba court of appeals must also make a ruling. If the appeals court upholds the decision, Turenne can appeal to Canada's Supreme Court.

"I know the process, she's going to appeal and all that, but this is the beginning of the end," said David Turenne's sister, Suzanne English. "All we ever wanted was for her to stand trial."

Monique Turenne's lover, Ralph Edward Crompton, is serving a life sentence for first-degree murder for his role in the officer's death. Crompton, 47, said David Turenne was alive when he left and the victim's wife killed him. Crompton is appealing his conviction.


Turenne willing to face charges... in Canada

A Winnipeg woman accused of murder in Florida says she's not delaying the inevitable by fighting an extradition order to the United States.

Monique Turenne, 46, said she is ready to go to court and face the charges, but is adamant the trial should be held in Canada.

"I'm not stalling. I'm fighting to stay here. I'm a Canadian, and David was a Canadian," said Turenne, who is charged with the 1996 murder of her husband, Air Force Maj. David Turenne, at their home in Panama City, Fla.

David Turenne was found beaten to death in the driveway of their home. He was on assignment with the U.S. Air Force.

Turenne and her lawyers have argued to have her case heard in Canada, asserting that the federal Justice Department should have assumed jurisdiction for the case because the victim was a member of the Canadian military and because his wife was charged with the crime.

Turenne's extradition was originally ordered by the Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench in 1999, but that decision was almost immediately challenged in the Manitoba appeal court.

After more than three years, federal Justice Minister Martin Cauchon signed an extradition order on Tuesday.

Turenne's lawyer, Greg Brodsky, said yesterday the order is just one more step up a ladder that could lead to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Ralph Crompton

"I don't now how long it will take," he said, but the first step is to get a ruling from the Manitoba Court of Appeal.

"Now he's made the decision, we can get on with the appeal," said Brodsky, who noted Cauchon said there were a number of issues to be considered by the court.

A man described as Turenne's lover, Ralph Edward Crompton (right), is serving a life sentence for first-degree murder for his role in the officer's death.

Crompton, 47, said David Turenne was alive when he left and the victim's wife killed him. Crompton is appealing his conviction.

The night before David Turenne's funeral, Winnipeg police interrogated Monique Turenne. Police later released a statement in which she confessed to the affair with Crompton, but not the murder. She would later claim the statement was fabricated by police (BELOW).


Turenne case to top court?

The lawyer for a Canadian woman charged with murder in Florida says it will be some time before the issue of her extradition to the United States to stand trial is settled.

After more than three years, federal Justice Minister Martin Cauchon signed an extradition order this week for Monique Turenne, 46, of Winnipeg. She is charged with the 1996 murder of her husband, Air Force Maj. David Turenne at their home in Panama City, Fla.

Lawyer Greg Brodsky said yesterday the order is just one more step on a ladder that could lead all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada.

"I don't know how long it will take," he said, but the first step is to get a ruling from the Manitoba Court of Appeal.

Turenne's extradition was ordered by the Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench in 1999 but that decision was almost immediately challenged in the Manitoba appeal court.

Waited three years

The appeal court in turn waited three years for a federal minister to make a decision and sign the order.

"Now he's made the decision, we can get on with the appeal," said Brodsky, who noted Cauchon said there were a number of issues to be considered by the court.

He said some of the things the minister has said also raise the possibility of further appeal.

One solution would be to try Turenne in Canada since she was only a temporary resident of the United States where here military husband was posted, Brodsky suggested.

A man described as Monique Turenne's lover, Ralph Edward Crompton, is serving a life sentence for first-degree murder for his role in the officer's death.

Crompton, 47, said David Turenne was alive when he left and the victim's wife killed him. Crompton is appealing his conviction.

Brodsky questions why Florida should rely on Crompton's evidence.


Monique Turenne's statement?

The nine page statement: This was taken by Loren Schinkel, who is now police union president. He shows up in other Winnipeg police stories. Schinkel first used the Reid method of interrogation (which is banned in the United Kingdom but used by many Canadian and U.S. police forces). When that didn't work he simply created a false nine page statement and forged her signature.

September, 2001 Monique's father wrote a letter to Police Chief Jack Ewatski, complaining of Detective Sgt. Loren Schinkel's violation of Monique's and his family's rights. Evidence of Loren's Schinkel's perjury is in the affidavit he swore December 29, 1997 for a Florida Grand Jury hearing, of which Monique Turrene was not informed, and where she was indicted for murder.

Disinformation about her was in the community where she lives before she knew it existed:

  • an "affair" she can prove never happened, concocted by the equivalent of a jailhouse informant (a man facing conviction and death and possibly innocent himself);
  • rumours she stood to gain huge sums of money as a motive when in fact she returned to the estate the $128.000 (minus legal fees) and has received only $409 a month from Canada Pension Plan for the six years since David's death.
  • Reports of her candid statements about her marital troubles distorted into wishing him dead
  • Reports she had tried to get a gun from a source who could be easily impeached. (Guns can be purchased at many stores in Panama City.)

Monique Turenne has been indicted by a grand jury in Florida on a circumstantial case which she has no opportunity to answer.

Monique Turenne has been smeared with lies that she has not had a chance to respond to.