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Whatever happened to "the lawyer who cared about people?"

Evidence that Reg Parker is a thief: He agreed to take Bobbi Stadnyk's case to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Reg Parker

Stadnyk is a former firefighter at the Regina airport who was sexually harrassed in 1981 but instead of getting her job back, after her charge of abuse was found to be true, she was promised a civil service job outside the firehall.

This case has been going on since the early 80s. Stadnyk received case development money to take her case to the Supreme Court. Ottawa lawyer Lucie Lalibertie took this money and promised to develop Stadnyk's case. Lalibertie put Stadnyk's case together with a case of a woman who was claiming sexual harassment in the army on the basis of "recovered" memories based on the smell of an aftershave lotion.

Meanwhile, Stadnyk was struggling to keep her case alive and realised she needed a local lawyer. She talked to Reg Parker. Stadnyk had done most of the case development herself when she handed the case over to Parker. Parker said he would take $10,000 upfront and he developed the claim.

Stadnyk paid $7,000 over two years but there has been no action on the file. Stadnyk continues to receive bills.


December 3, 1998 inJusticebusters admire the compassion which Reg Parker has shown in many aspects of his public and private life. We thought he was a good lawyer and referred many cases to him -- about $60,000 worth.

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The Saskatoon StarPhoenix published this human interest portrait July 15, 1989. Almost ten years later, it is time to revisit the man who built his law practice on a reputation for helping the downtrodden.

Reg Parker

inJusticebusters spent many hours in that charming office at the top of the Bessborough Hotel and many more across the table from Reg Parker drinking coffee with him in the hotel's coffee shop. We confided many things and showed our vulnerability. Being with Reg made us feel safe. He was a father figure as well as a lawyer. We were vulnerable and downtrodden. We brought him clients who were also vulnerable and in need of sound, legal advice.