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It is three years since the cops arrested him in his own home, handcuffed him in front of his children, took him to the police station where they strip-searched him and held for over 30 hours. The charges did not stick, but any police check on him now shows him as an accused sex offender whose charges were stayed. The police are still up to their old tricks as the following article shows…

"Of 725 child sex abuse complaints investigated by Edmonton police in 2000, 2001 and 2002, only 160 - about 22% - resulted in criminal charges being laid. But that doesn't mean the other 565 cases were all false allegations, Eastcott said." Then what were they?

Remember, in 1992 prosecutor Matt Miazga said he was staying charges against the Klassens and Kvellos in Saskatoon because the children were "too traumatized to testify". On December 30, 2004 he was found to have been malicious. --Sheila Steele


Abdulahi Mahamad "John Smith"

Man sues police, ex-wife for 'conspiracy'

This is the "No-name" case which was in the news during the winter of 2003

Mahamad Abdulahi

A city man cleared of abuse charges levelled by his former wife after a judge slammed cops for "blind acceptance" of her story is now suing her, the police and several witnesses. The 37-year-old paramedic - who can't be named under a publication ban granted during his trial last year - claims his ex-wife, along with her mother, sister and a friend, defamed him by making up stories he'd abused her physically and sexually during their four-year marriage, which ended in 1998.

They and two Edmonton cops, constables Merle Dick and Dan Duiker, "collectively engaged in an unlawful conspiracy" to cause him mental anguish, loss of freedom, humiliation and economic loss, says a statement of claim filed by the man in Court of Queen's Bench Jan. 27.

The claim also names police Chief Bob Wasylyshen as the head of the police force, though he had no direct involvement. No statement of defence has been filed in the case. Statements of claim contain allegations which have not been proven in court.

Queen's Bench Justice Sterling Sanderman acquitted the man of all charges last March and criticized Edmonton police for arresting him based on affidavits and witness statements gathered by his ex-wife and her family, without doing any follow-up investigation of their own.

"There was no careful analysis of the complaints that were being made. Worse, there was no independent investigation ... So the validity of this complaint was never properly tested by any police agency," Sanderman said.

Before his acquittal, the man was also arrested for breaching a no-contact order with his wife - by sending her a cheque and child-support payment information by courier. Sanderman called that arrest "an unbalanced approach" by police. The breach charge was dismissed.

The judge also noted that the ex-wife and several witnesses bore some animosity toward the man, and that she tried to use the charges he was facing as ammunition in a custody battle over their seven-year-old son.

The suit, which asks for more than $200,000 in damages, also alleges constables Dick and Duiker "acted in a high-handed, arrogant and oppressive manner" with the man despite his lack of a criminal record.

No-name cases and the new infantalization of women

Earlier this century women fought for the right to vote claiming we were persons. Persons with names. Now we see a reversion to unpersonhood as the following story shows. The judge in this case is being asked to believe a rather unlikely story -- and the defence lawyer is behind the 8-ball because a 26 year old woman is hiding behind the rape shield law and the Jehovah Witness religion after having made some rather whiney allegations against her husband. Having secured anonymity for everyone connected to her, she has enlisted her sister and her best friend as a witnesses.

Double, double toil and trouble…

Four years elapsed between the alleged incidents and the complaints. Fear is cited as the reason for this lengthy interval.

What is she now afraid of? Why is she asking her name be kept secret? She is not afraid. She is ashamed. Ashamed to face up to the fact that this is a custody battle and she is fighting unfairly to get an advantage. Perhaps she wants a huge part of this paramedic's salary as well. Paramedics are not highly paid people. But she can put him in the poor house if she can just get the kids…

Inside the court room she should not be afraid. The bailiffs are there to protect her. Her husband knows who she is. So what's the big bloody secret? Judges really should be more careful about handing out publication bans.

It is entirely possible the only thing being protected is mischief.

She didn't get away with it. The charges didn't stick. The judge chastised the police for laying charges based on affidavits gathered by a complainant with an ax to grind.

The next thing we want to see are charges being laid against such mischievous complainants.

Judge slams shoddy cop work

A city paramedic was found not guilty yesterday of abusing his ex-wife in a case riddled with "diametrically opposed" evidence and "blind acceptance" by cops, said a Court of Queen's Bench judge.

Justice Sterling Sanderman said in his decision he didn't believe all the evidence from the 36-year-old accused.

But Sanderman said he couldn't convict based on evidence from the man's ex-wife, who tried to use his criminal charges to bolster her bid for custody of their seven-year-old son.

"She does attempt to turn the charges made against (the accused) to her advantage," Sanderman noted.

The accused, who can't be named to protect the identity of his ex-wife, was accused of sexually and physically abusing the woman during a four-year marriage that ended in 1998.

But Sanderman said the ex-wife and several witnesses "bear some animosity" towards the accused, making it "dangerous" to convict on their evidence.

And Sanderman criticized police for laying charges based on affidavits and witness statements gathered by the woman and her family. Police arrested the accused without any follow-up investigation after the woman went to cops with her evidence in January 2002, he noted.

"There was no careful analysis of the complaints that were being made. Worse, there was no independent investigation," said Sanderman.

"So the validity of this complaint was never properly tested by a police agency."

Sanderman also criticized police for arresting the accused last month on allegations he breached an order to have no contact with his ex-wife.

The woman called cops after her ex-husband couriered a cheque and child-support-payment information to her home, something cops viewed as "a grave breach" of his conditions, Sanderman said.

"I find that to be an unbalanced approach taken by the police service in this investigation."

Police spokesman Annette Bidniak told The Sun yesterday police will review Sanderman's concerns. "We take those comments very seriously."


Sex assault case now rests with judge: Ex-wife says she was afraid to leave marriage

A judge is slated to rule Monday on whether or not an Edmonton paramedic is guilty of assaulting and sexually assaulting his former wife.

The 36-year-old, who can't be named to protect the identity of his ex-wife, is accused of slapping her, choking her, twisting her arm, hitting her with a pot and a hockey stick, and kicking out a chair on which she was standing, all during a four-year marriage she said she was too afraid to leave.

The 26-year-old also said she was prevented from leaving the marriage by her being a Jehovah's Witness, a religion she said frowns on divorce unless there is infidelity.

The man is also accused of forcing unwanted anal sex on her.

In closing arguments yesterday, defence lawyer Larry Anderson said the evidence of his client, who denied the allegations ever happened, was not impeached. As well, Anderson argued the complainant's evidence was evasive and contradictory. "I would suggest she was not only a weak witness, but also unreliable and not candid," said Anderson, adding that even if his client was not believed, the allegations were not proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

Anderson also suggested the allegations were made up by an angry and bitter woman who was attempting to get sole custody of the former couple's seven-year-old son.

Crown prosecutor Val Campbell said the case comes down to the credibility of the witnesses. She argued the former wife had gone to police because she believed she was being stalked by her ex-husband, but said the charges came later as a result of additional information being provided.

She disputed the statement that the charges arose from the custody battle, saying custody had already been settled and noting the police were never contacted during the lengthy fight.

Regarding the chair-kicking incident, Campbell said the woman's story was backed up by her sister's testimony. She argued all charges were proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

She added the alleged anal rape just backed up the accused's "abusive and controlling treatment" of his former spouse throughout their marriage.


Paramedic trial turns into case of 'he-said, she-said'

The trial of a city paramedic charged with assaulting and sexually assaulting his former wife has turned into a case of he-said, she-said.

The 36-year-old, who can't be named to protect the identity of his 26-year-old ex-wife, yesterday denied all of the accusations made against him, while testifying in his own defence at his Court of Queen's Bench trial.

"It never happened," was his standard reply when asked about the specific allegations in the charges.

He admitted there were various problems in their marriage and he was "assertive" on some things.

"(She) didn't like my sharp tongue," he testified. "I wasn't tactful. I would be sarcastic. I wasn't considerate."

However, he denied abusing his former spouse and said he thinks she could be making up the allegations to support her bid for sole custody of their seven-year-old son.

The woman has testified her former husband slapped her, choked her, twisted her arm, hit her with a hockey stick and kicked out a chair she was standing on during a four-year marriage she said she was too afraid to leave.

She also said she was prevented from leaving the marriage by her being a Jehovah's Witness, a religion she said frowns on divorce unless there is infidelity.

The woman, who can't be identified under a court-ordered publication ban, said the alleged sexual assault happened when he forced unwanted anal sex on her.

Yesterday, the woman's best friend testified that during the choking incident she also witnessed the man hitting his then-wife on the head with a pot.

As well, the woman's sister testified she witnessed the chair-kicking incident.

The marriage ended in 1998, but the paramedic wasn't charged until after she went to police in January 2002.

The man's boss said earlier he will remain off work until the charges have been dealt with.

The trial continues today.


Custody plot denied:
Ex-wife tells court of being stalked

The former wife of a city paramedic charged with assaulting and sexually assaulting her denied yesterday that she went to police as part of a custody battle over their son.

Defence lawyer Larry Anderson suggested to the 26-year-old woman in cross-examination that she had made up all of the allegations because she didn't like the way custody was being awarded in family court.

The woman testified that was untrue and said she went to police because her ex-husband was harassing her.

"I felt he was stalking me," she said.

Court heard police told her to bring in documented evidence and fill out witness statements and the paramedic was eventually charged with beating his former wife and sexually assaulting her, her sister and one of her friends.

Yesterday the Crown invited the judge in the case to dismiss the latter two sex-assault charges.

The woman has testified that her former spouse slapped her, choked her, twisted her arm, hit her with a hockey stick and kicked out a chair she was standing on during a four-year marriage she said she was too afraid to leave.

She also said she was prevented from leaving the marriage because she is of the Jehovah's Witness faith, a religion she said frowns on divorce unless there is infidelity.

The woman, who can't be identified under a court-ordered publication ban, said the alleged sexual assault happened when he forced unwanted anal sex on her.

The 36-year-old paramedic, who can't be named to protect the identity of his former wife, was charged after the woman went to police in January 2002.

The man's boss said earlier the man will remain off work until the charges have been dealt with.

The Court of Queen's Bench trial continues today.


Paramedic's wife tells of terror

An Edmonton paramedic went on trial yesterday accused of beating his former wife and sexually assaulting her, her sister and one of her friends.

The 26-year-old ex-wife testified he slapped her, choked her, twisted her arm and kicked a chair from under her while she was changing a light bulb during a four-year marriage she said she was too afraid to leave.

"I was really, really scared," she said, adding he threatened to flee with their son and hurt her family.

She said her ex-husband once told her he'd hunt (her) whole family down ... if she left him.

The soft-spoken woman said she also was prevented from leaving the marriage by her faith as a Jehovah's Witness, a religion she said frowns on divorce unless one of the parties cheats on the other.

The woman, who can't be identified under a court-ordered publication ban, testified her former husband choked her until she passed out in 1994 during an argument while they had friends over for dinner.

"He just looked at me and squeezed," she said.

In 1996, she said she rebuked him for belching into her face and he slapped her across the cheek. The alleged chair-kicking incident also happened that year, she said.

In 1997, she said her ex struck her several times with a hockey stick after she allowed their son to play hockey inside the home using his hockey tape as a puck.

"He hit me across the back of the legs with it," she said, adding on the same day he also twisted her arm behind her back when she refused to give him her bank card.

The alleged sexual assault happened in 1998 when he forced unwanted anal sex on her, she testified.

The woman described her former husband as being controlling and highly egotistical about his job as a paramedic.

"He used to say when people are praying to God, they're praying to me...," she said.

The 36-year-old paramedic, who can't be named to protect the identity of his former wife, was charged after the woman went to police in January 2002. The man's boss said earlier he will remain off work until the charges have been dealt with.

The Court of Queen's Bench trial continues today.