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Monique Turenne: The extradition

This extradition travesty highlights how U.S. and Canadian authorities break their own laws to frame, track down and prosecute innocent people

Monique Turenne

Monique Turenne is now in custody in Bay County jail, Panama City. She has not been allowed to choose her own counsel (she had found a legal defender who would take her case) and has been assigned to the same lawyer who defended Ralph Crompton at Crompton's first trial.

At the Bay County facility she must provide her own food and clothing.

Clothing sent by her son in Winnipeg was rejected by the facility as inappropriate. She still has not been given money which was sent from Canada before Christmas.

The extradition violates all humane impulses of justice and fair play. She had already been cleared by the Canadian military authorities who conducted an investigation before returning her, her children and her husband's body to Winnipeg. Panama City police and prosecutors devised a ruse to have her questioned by Winnipeg police the night before her husband's funeral. Loren Schinkel and Jim Thiessen had no jurisdiction but claimed to have received authority to take her in from a NORAD officer. Years later, we discover this officer did not make any such request for an interview and that he was not even in the country.

In other words the Florida authorities interfered with Canadian justice and the Winnipeg Police Service obliged.

A Florida Grand Jury was presented with a perjured affidavit from Loren Schinkel accompanying a nine page "confession" which he claims to be the words of Monique Turenne. This document is type-written as though transcribed from a tape but according to the Winnipeg police, the six-eight hour interrogation was not taped. It contains "details" which could not possibly be true and which do not correspond to the evidence which convicted Ralph Crompton of the murder.

Canadians should be concerned. Vancouver citizen John Graham is now facing an extradition hearing with many of the same issues of illegal U.S./Canada police collaboration. And of course there is the scandalous case of Atif Rafay and Sebastian Burns where police on both sides of the border broke the law to manufacture evidence which has sent two Canadians to prison for life.


Supreme Court dismisses Monique Turenne's application to order her trial in Canada

December 16, 2004: Monique Turenne will have to go to Florida to face trial for murder charges which were laid by a grand jury based on the testimony of Ralph Crompton, who is already convicted murdering David Turenne. Both Monique and David were Canadian citizens living off-base in Panama City where David was a major in the Canadian air force.

Monique Turenne was thoroughly investigated before being sent home with her two children in a Canadian Air Force plane in 1996. Florida police arranged for Winnipeg police to take her in for questioning the night before her husband's funeral. There, Loren Schinkel and Jim Thiessen did a Reid Technique interrogation for nine hours during which Monique Turenne claims she told them she had never had an affair with Crompton and was not involved in any way with her husband's murder. The interview was not taped on either video or audio. Almost three years later, a nine page typed statement sworn to by Loren Schinkel was presented to a grand jury in Florida. This, and testimony from Crompton who had been cited as an incorrigible liar during his own trial, were the only evidence the Florida grand jury based its indictment on.

The statement created by Schinkel is fanciful. In it, Monique is supposed to have asked her husband to go to the drug store in the middle of the night to get her some Midol for menstrual cramps. When I spoke to Monique Turenne about this, she told me that was preposterous for two reasons: she had never used Midol since she tried it once as a teenager and, more importantly, David Turenne was not the kind of husband who ran errands for his wife. In fact he had not come into the house the night he died and evidence from the crime scene suggests he was intercepted and killed after he entered the yard but before he came into the house.

For some time news reports have stated that Florida authorities claim Monique confessed to Florida police. If the Florida authorities are saying that, they are lying. The only "confession" is the forged document created by Loren Schinkel and Jim Thiessen of the Winnipeg police. It is a document which would not withstand scrutiny in any Canadian court.

Every Friday for the last five years, Monique Turenne has presented herself to the Public Safety Building in Winnipeg to report to the police, as a condition of her bail. Contrary to some reports filed by malicious in-laws, she does not have much money and has worked for most of the time she has been in Canada. Her deceased husband's sister, who is executrix of the estate, has fought her applications in court for basic needs for her children. The court has granted money for some dental and other bills. Her oldest son, Daniel, turned 18 this year and is attending university.

Turenne first contacted injusticebusters three years ago. Links to previous stories are in sidebar.


Winnipeg woman loses final bid to escape extradition on murder charge

WINNIPEG (CP) - A Winnipeg woman accused of killing her husband in Florida nearly nine years ago turned herself in to RCMP Thursday after losing a last-ditch attempt to avoid extradition.

The Supreme Court of Canada refused to hear Monique Turenne's appeal, leaving her no choice but to return to Florida to stand trial on a first-degree murder charge. "Ms. Turenne turned herself in this morning, accompanied by her lawyer," said RCMP Sgt. Steve Colwell.

"She's at the provincial remand centre and will await the arrival of U.S. authorities to come and bring her back."

Colwell did not know how soon Turenne would leave Canada.

No reason was given for the top court's decision, as is custom with leave applications.

Lawyers had argued that sending Turenne back to the United States would violate her charter rights.

But the Manitoba Court of Appeal dismissed those arguments last summer, saying Turenne failed to establish the extradition judge erred in rejecting her bid to stay in Canada.

Her request to have the Supreme Court hear the case was considered a long shot because the Appeal Court was unanimous.

Turenne was charged after her husband, Canadian Forces Maj. David Turenne, was beaten to death with a hammer outside their home in Panama City, Fla., in February 1996.

Ralph Crompton, who police allege was Turenne's lover in a triangle gone wrong, was arrested immediately after the slaying and is serving a life sentence in Florida. His appeal has been denied.

Turenne has always maintained her innocence.

Prosecutors maintain Crompton acted on her instructions and that Turenne confessed to Florida police she set up her husband to be attacked by her lover.

During his 1996 testimony in court, Crompton implicated Turenne in the plot to kill her husband and even suggested she wielded the claw hammer that killed him.

Turenne has said she's ready to stand trial, but wanted to keep the case in Canada on a reduced charge of manslaughter.

"I'm never going to get a fair trial down there," Turenne said after the Manitoba Court of Appeal decision last July.

"The deck has been stacked against me.

"But I'm not afraid to stand trial. I'd do it tomorrow if I could. I want to clear my name. But the trial should be held in Winnipeg."

Turenne was first ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba's Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999.

Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both the Manitoba Court of Appeal and the federal justice minister. The case stalled for several years until former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March 2003.

The appeal was argued last spring.

Turenne had been living in Winnipeg with her children on bail conditions.


Winnipeg woman to be extradited

OTTAWA (CP) - The country's highest court refused Thursday to hear a Winnipeg woman's last-ditch bid to avoid extradition to the United States to face a murder charge.

The Supreme Court's dismissal of Monique Turenne's application for leave to appeal ends an eight-year legal fight, leaving her no choice but to return to Florida to stand trial for the death of her husband. No reason was given for the court's decision, as is custom with leave applications.

Lawyers had argued that sending Turenne back to the United States would violate her charter rights.

But the Manitoba Court of Appeal dismissed those arguments last summer, saying Turenne failed to establish that the extradition judge erred in rejecting her bid to stay in Canada.

Her request to have the Supreme Court hear the case was considered a long shot because the Appeal Court was unanimous.

Turenne was charged with first-degree murder after her husband, Canadian Forces Maj. David Turenne, was beaten to death outside their home in Panama City, Fla., in February 1996.

Ralph Crompton, who police allege was Turenne's lover in a triangle gone wrong, was arrested immediately after the slaying and is currently serving a life sentence in Florida. His appeal has been denied.

Turenne has always maintained her innocence.

Prosecutors maintain Crompton acted on her instructions and Turenne confessed to Florida police she set her husband up to be attacked by her lover.

During his 1996 testimony in court, Crompton implicated Turenne in the plot to kill her husband and even suggested she wielded the claw hammer that killed him.

Turenne has said she's ready to stand trial, but wants to keep the case in Canada on a reduced charge of manslaughter.

"I'm never going to get a fair trial down there," Turenne said after the Manitoba Court of Appeal decision last July.

"The deck has been stacked against me.

"But I'm not afraid to stand trial. I'd do it tomorrow if I could. I want to clear my name. But the trial should be held in Winnipeg."

Neither Turenne nor her lawyers were immediately available for comment.

Turenne was first ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba's Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999.

Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both the Manitoba Court of Appeal and the federal justice minister. The case stalled for several years until former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March 2003.

The appeal was argued last spring.

Turenne has been living in Winnipeg with her children on bail conditions.


Monique Turenne's son's letter to Justice Minister Cotler

October 27, 2004

The Honourable Irwin Cotler

Minister of Justice
Justice Canada
East Memorial Building
4th Floor - 284 Wellington Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H8

Dear Sir:

Subject: Monique Turenne Extradition - S.C.C. No. 30478

I am once again writing you to request a thorough investigation of my mother's case.

As I explained in my first letter dated August 26, 2004, the United States are abusing their power and the extradition treaty. I understand that as long as the United States presents a prima facie case, the extradition should proceed. But shouldn't Canada at least investigate whether or not the United States, or any other country for that matter, has indeed presented such. The only way to guarantee a Canadian's right is to oblige the requesting party to present disclosure on any questionable issues.

I was provided with the American definition of the Grand Jury mandate: quote "Grand Jury proceedings are secret. Only the witnesses who testify could reveal what happened, if they chose to. Inside the grand jury room, the burden of proof on the government (US) is minimal - they need merely convince a bare majority of the jurors that there is probable cause to believe a crime has taken place. The prosecutor may introduce hearsay, and the target (accused) and his lawyer have no right to learn what has taken place or to offer any refutation. It is not what you would describe as evenhanded. " Unquote.

This so-called hearsay was presented to the Canadian government as a prima facia case. I seriously doubt that your predecessor, Mr. Martin Cauchon, took the time to review Crompton's entire trial transcript that was provided. Had he, he would most certainly have acknowledged our arguments and proof of abuse. The International Assistance Group most certainly did not review same either, otherwise they would have contacted the US to advise that they have not presented a prima facia case (although they originally accepted documents and/or US evidence at face value).

As stated under the 'Attorney General of Canada' website: The Attorney General does not, however, direct or cause charges to be laid. While the Attorney General and the Attorney General's agents may provide legal advice to the police, the ultimate decision whether or not to lay charges is for the police. Once the charge is laid the decision as to whether the prosecution should proceed, and in what matter, is for the Attorney General and the Crown Attorney. That be said, here are my remarks:

a) Why did the Winnipeg Police not lay charges? The answer is quite simple - their 'criminal' actions (denying Miranda rights, threats and abuse) would have been exposed in a Winnipeg court. I had forwarded a copy of the letter my Grandfather sent to Chief Ewatski detailing police misconduct. My Grandfather's claims can easily be verified. Insofar as police abuse, I also enclosed a copy of the hospital medical report which showed my mother had been physically abused by the police. Insofar as my mother's alleged statement, the very fact that a person would sign such a declaration without legal representation should be of primary concern in this case - given the fact that same was taken over a nine (9) hour interrogation the night prior to the funeral. As I stated in my August 26/04 letter, I was present the night of my step-father's murder. The Winnipeg Police statement was rewritten by the two officers and do not represent the true events. Furthermore, State Attorney Appleman and Detective Mike Jones were fully aware and condone same. State Attorney Appleman not only presented my mother's alleged police statement to the Grand Jury but to the International Assistance Group as well. His hypocrisy should be exposed and condemned in Canada.

b) The United States did not present the entire trial transcript but rather only portions of it. We had to go through channels to obtain same to further prove that the United States are not acting in good faith. They are just presenting portions whereby Ralph Crompton, convicted of 1st degree murder, accuses my mother of murder. The jury did not believe his version of events. Notably, there was no blood found in our house or on my mother. Given Crompton's version, my mother would have been obligated to drag the body at least 20 feet, manoeuvre same around vehicles and a large planter and position same as well as the blood splatter. My stepfather weighed over 195 lbs, my mother weighed 95 lbs. The United States intentionally did not forward the entire transcript to avoid having to answer these discrepancies as a prima facia case would not have existed.

c) Insofar as Detective Mike Jones's affidavit whereby he states they found four (4) $25,000.00 life insurance policies in my stepfather's room (on a dresser inside his closet), same is but another theory for the United States. In case their 'affair theory' should fail (which my mother can prove), the US will bring forth this second theory. Fortunately, these London Life Insurance policies were actually held in a portfolio which a Canadian military member found inside the filing cabinet, gave to my mother who then handed them to the executrix. Note that the executrix, Patrice Turenne Oscarson has had numerous telephone conversations and correspondence with the US authorities and was quite adamant in providing 'evidence' against my mother. On one insurance policy, the portfolio buckle is clearly visible. If same was loosely placed on a dresser, how do you explain the buckle? Also note that given all the media attention, there was never mention of these insurance policies until the first extradition hearing. The US did not want to get caught in their deception. Also note that Detective Mike Jones 'retired' under unusual conditions shortly after his investigation.

The above information clearly exposes the United States' abuse of the existing Extradition Act. This case does affect public interest and public rights. The United States knowingly presented a fraudulent case and unless Canada challenges same by questioning and demanding disclosure, another Canadian may face the same faith.

Our military members and their families are transferred to various bases throughout the world. Although our military members are given all rights and privileges, their spouses and children are not given this same consideration. Spouses and children are not offered any protection from the Canadian government. Honestly speaking, they are actually classified as F & E (furniture and effects). Although they are obligated to follow their military spouses (often with much hesitation), they are classified as temporary 'forgotten civilians' and honestly not recognized as part of the Canadian "military structure". Military dependents (spouses and children) should receive the same rights and protection especially in these uncertain times. Should my mother's case proceed in the US, I sincerely believe that every Canadian military spouse will hesitate thereafter in accepting to accompany their spouse out-of-country.

It goes without saying that the USA has maintained a grudge against all countries that did not deploy troops to support their war on terrorism. This is very evident in Canada given the soft-lumber dispute, mad cow fiasco, etc... The fact that Florida, its governor and the US President have brought this up numerous times, does not reflect well on a fair trial for the widow of a Canadian military member. Another key point that begs the question, "Will she really receive a fair trial?".

Insofar as witnesses and evidence that will be brought forth at trial, you'd think that Canada would like to hang its military "dirty laundry" on its own turf. Although most military members were tight-lipped and/or refused to comment on one of their own, civilians and military spouses (including US military spouses) are quite adamant and prepared to testify about our Canadian military members' after-hours activities. The Canadian military has had its share of military blunders and scandals. This case will not be any different. I have personally witnessed abusive military drinking (other than my step-father), disregard for marriage, drug use, stolen property, etc... Note that certain civilians are still talking about the wild parties which took place in Panama City prior and during our stay. These involved senior military officers. The US will probably thank us for withholding our troops after hearing evidence of repeated military misconduct by military officers.

Defence evidence which knowingly questions the extradition request should be allowed. A military spouse should be given the same consideration as the military member. This should not be viewed as a privilege but as a right.

As Minister of Justice, you have the ability to question the validity of this case. You also have the right to exercise your power and order said trial be held in Canada, either a civil court or military tribunal.

I sincerely hope that you will understand my frustrations and review our evidence.

Yours sincerely,

Daniel Paille
71 Burntwood Crescent
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2J 2Z9

CC: Assistance Attorney General
CC: Minister of National Defence


Big defeat for Turenne
Extradition for murder trial in U.S. near certain after appeal fails

A stunned Monique Turenne vows she is ready to stand trial for the murder of her husband -- a reality she likely faces after Manitoba's highest court denied her final attempt yesterday to fight extradition to Florida.

In a unanimous decision, the Court of Appeal cleared the way for the eight-year legal odyssey to finally move forward by ruling that allegations of procedural unfairness and a lack of disclosure aren't sufficient to overturn the federal extradition order.

Turenne, who is charged with first-degree murder, had been fighting to keep the case in Canada on a reduced charge of manslaughter and under more lax Canadian laws.

Florida officials have already agreed not to pursue the death penalty, although she would face life with no parole if convicted.

"This is ridiculous," Turenne told the Free Press yesterday afternoon from her Winnipeg home. "My jaw dropped when I heard this. We're just in shock. I'm never going to get a fair trial down there. The deck has been stacked against me."

"But I'm not afraid to stand trial. I'd do it tomorrow if I could. I want to clear my name. But the trial should be held in Winnipeg."

Turenne has always maintained her innocence in the slaying of her husband, Canadian air force Maj. David Turenne, who was found beaten to death in the driveway of their Panama City, Fla. bungalow in February 1996.

Police believe his killing was the result of a love triangle gone bad.

Ralph Crompton, a retired U.S. air force master sergeant, is serving life in prison after being convicted of first-degree murder for his role in Turenne's death.

Police alleged Crompton and Monique Turenne were having an affair.

During his 1996 testimony in court, Crompton implicated Turenne in the plot to kill her husband and even suggested she wielded the claw hammer that killed him while he looked on.

"There never was an affair," Turenne said yesterday.

"And if there was an affair, why would it be with someone like that?"

After arguing Crompton was the principal killer, Florida prosecutors are now saying he was simply acting on instructions from Turenne.

"The appellant is guilty of the crime of first-degree murder... and she did herself or did aid and assist Ralph Crompton in striking her husband repeatedly in the head with a blunt object, therefore intentionally causing his death," an affidavit from a Florida state attorney reads.

Turenne and her lawyers say they can't "have it both ways" and have committed an "abuse of process."

"Crompton... was the one who had blood on his hands," said lawyer Anthony Dalmyn.

Her other lawyer, Greg Brodsky, argued the extradition process has been derailed by interference from the Canadian government.

He has been refused access to documents pertaining to the police investigation of Turenne's death and communication between the Manitoba, Canadian and American governments.

Brodsky said the documents are important because they played a role in the murder conviction of Crompton, and sending Turenne to Florida would violate her charter rights. He also argued the wrong charge has been laid against his client.

"If there was an unlawful act here, it's manslaughter," he said.

Brodsky also wanted a military tribunal in Canada to try Turenne, but the appeal court noted a three-year limitation period on that process expired in February 1999.

"The appellant's argument remains one that is lacking a factual foundation. It remains one without merit," the high court wrote yesterday.

Turenne was first ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba's Court of Queen's Bench in October, 1999.

Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both the Manitoba Court of Appeal and then-federal justice minister Anne McLellan.

The case stalled for several years until former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March 2003.

The appeal to Manitoba's highest court was then filed, and the case was argued this past spring.

Turenne has one final chance by pleading with the Supreme Court of Canada to hear the case. The move is considered a long shot because Manitoba's appeal court was unanimous.

"I'm staying optimistic, and I'm not giving up," said Turenne.

Brodsky said yesterday he will file a motion seeking leave to appeal and expects an answer by the end of the year.

Turenne has been living in the city with her children on bail conditions Brodsky expects will be allowed to continue.


Manitoba woman can't block extradition

WINNIPEG (CP) - Manitoba's highest court has denied a bid by a woman accused in the death of her husband to avoid extradition to face the charge.

Lawyers for Monique Turenne had argued that sending her to Florida to stand trial would violate her charter rights. But the Manitoba Court of Appeal dismissed those arguments in a written judgment Thursday. "She has failed to establish that the extradition judge committed error in her assessment of the facts or application of the law," the panel of three judges wrote.

Turenne was charged with first-degree murder after her husband, Canadian Forces Maj. David Turenne, was beaten to death outside their home in Panama City, Fla., in February 1996.

Her lover, Ralph Crompton, was arrested immediately after the slaying and is currently serving a life sentence in Florida. His appeal has been denied.

Turenne's lawyers wanted the appeal court to also stay a judicial review by the federal attorney general that supported extradition. The judges dismissed that argument as well.

"She has not shown that the minister violated her constitutional rights or otherwise erred in law, denied her procedural fairness, acted arbitrarily, in bad faith or for improper motives, or that his decision is plainly unreasonable," the judgment said.

Florida prosecutors maintain that Crompton acted on Turenne's instructions.

In 1999 a Court of Queen's Bench judge ruled that at the very least a case of manslaughter could be made against her.

She initially denied any involvement but later confessed to Florida police she set her husband up to be attacked by her lover.

During his 1996 testimony in court, Crompton implicated Turenne in the plot to kill her husband and even suggested she wielded the claw hammer that killed him.

injusticebusters note:

Once again, the press is stating that Monique Turenne confessed to the Florida police. This is a defamatory lie. Monique Turenne has consistently maintained her innocence and was thoroughly investigated by the Florida police before she was allowed to return to Canada.


Extradition violates charter rights: lawyer
Murder charge faces Turenne in Florida

Lawyers for Monique Turenne argued yesterday that extraditing her to Florida to face a murder charge violates her charter rights.

They want the Manitoba Court of Appeal to stay both a lower court ruling and a judicial review by the federal attorney general that supported extradition.

Turenne is charged with first-degree murder after her husband, Canadian Forces Maj. David Turenne, was beaten to death outside their Panama City, Fla., home in February 1996.

Her ex-lover, Ralph Crompton, was arrested immediately after the slaying and is currently serving a life sentence in Florida. His appeal has been denied.

"Florida clearly pursued Crompton as the principal," Turenne's lawyer, Anthony Dalmyn, told the court. "He was the one who had blood on his hands."

But Dalmyn said Florida prosecutors are now saying that Crompton was acting on instructions of his client -- essentially trying to have it both ways.

"That's an abuse of process," Dalmyn said.

In 1999, a Court of Queen's Bench ruled that at the very least a case of manslaughter could be made against Monique Turenne.

Turenne was ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba's Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999. Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both Manitoba Court of Appeal and then-federal justice minister Anne McLellan. Former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March 2003.

Turenne initially denied any involvement but later confessed to Florida police she set her husband up to be attacked by Crompton.

During his 1996 testimony in court, Crompton implicated Monique Turenne in the plot to kill her husband and even suggested she wielded the claw hammer which killed him.

A defence motion for access to documents pertaining to the police investigation and communication between various governments was turned down last week.

Arguments before the court of appeal are expected to wrap up today.


Lawyer argues against extraditing murder suspect to Panhandle

WINNIPEG, MB - Extraditing a Canadian woman to Florida to face a murder charge in the death of her husband would violate her charter rights, lawyers argued Wednesday.

They want the Manitoba Court of Appeal to block a lower court ruling and reverse a judicial review by the federal attorney general that supported the extradition of Monique Turenne, 47, of Winnipeg.

She was charged with first-degree murder after her husband, Canadian air force Maj. David Turenne, 42, was beaten to death outside their Panama City, Fla., home in February 1996. He was stationed at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base with the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD).

Monique Turenne's former lover, retired U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Ralph Crompton, was convicted of first-degree murder and is serving a life sentence.

Turenne initially denied any involvement but later confessed to Florida police she set up her husband to be attacked by Crompton.

"Florida clearly pursued Crompton as the principal," defense lawyer Anthony Dalmyn told the high court. "He was the one who had blood on his hands."

Prosecutors, however, now are saying Crompton acted on instructions from Turenne, Dalmyn said.

"That's an abuse of process," he said.

In 1999 a Court of Queen's Bench ruled that a manslaughter case - not murder - could be made against Turenne.

During his 1996 testimony in court, Crompton implicated Turenne in the plot to kill her husband and suggested she wielded the claw hammer used to kill him.

Turenne is not in custody. Arguments are expected to wrap up Thursday.


Extradition hearing set for wife of Canadian slain in Panhandle

PANAMA CITY, FL -An extradition hearing is set next week in Canada for a woman charged with killing her husband, a Canadian air force officer, eight years ago in the Florida Panhandle.

Lawyers for Monique Turenne beginning next Wednesday will ask a three-judge panel in Winnipeg to block an extradition ordered approved by a Canadian minister of justice last year, said Karen Fulham, a spokeswoman for the Manitoba Court of Appeals.

The 47-year-old Canadian woman is charged with the beating death of Maj. David Turenne, 42, outside their Panama City home Feb. 9, 1996. He was a software support supervisor for a North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) unit at nearby Tyndall Air Force Base.

Monique Turenne returned to Canada before she was indicted. Her boyfriend, retired U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Ralph Crompton, 49, was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison for his part in the killing.

Crompton admitted he fought with David Turenne but testified the victim was still alive when he left the scene. He denied wielding a hammer allegedly used to inflict the fatal blows.

In papers filed with the appeal court, defense lawyer G. Greg Brodsky argues Crompton's testimony suggesting his client struck her husband was "manifestly unreliable" and insufficient to support extradition.

If the appeal court affirms extradition, Turenne could make a final appeal the Canadian Supreme Court. Canadian authorities considered extradition only after Florida prosecutors agreed not to seek a death sentence.

The appeal court Monday dismissed a defense motion to let Canadian military police officer Pierre Raymond testify about his investigation into the death. Another defense lawyer, Anthony Dalmyn, had argued the Canadian military had the primary right under international law to prosecute Monique Turenne.


Monique Turenne: Canadian woman indicted for murder by secret Florida grand jury is fighting to prove her innocence at a fair trial in Canada

Her murdered husband was a Canadian soldier. After a full investigation the military let Monique and her two children return to Canada.

Then, the man who was convicted of the murder, tied to the case with DNA evidence, decided to create a story that he had been having an affair with the widow and that she did the deed. Ralph Crompton had already lied under oath at least 40 times. The implication of Monique was a transparent ploy to avoid the death penalty.

It remains to be seen who asked Winnipeg cop Loren Schinkel to look into the matter. He and his partner, Jim Thiessen, took Monique Turenne from her house just before midnight, the night before her husband's funeral. They held her and interrogated her for nine hours.

The interview was not taped. Monique Turenne did not "confess". It was only through her own investigation that she learned a forged 9 page "confession", neatly typed and accompanied by a signed affidavit attesting to its truth, had been presented to a Grand Jury in Florida. On the basis of this falsified document, Monique Tuenne was ordered extradited to stand trial in Florida.

On May 25, her lawyer, Greg Brodsky, will appeal to a federal court in Winnipeg for the release of the secret documents on which the government relied when it ordered her extradition. On May 17, a court refused to order the release of any of these documents.


Motion in Turenne case rejected
Means extradition appeal will still be heard next week

There is light at the end of the tunnel for a Winnipeg woman awaiting extradition to Florida on charges she murdered her husband in 1996.

Manitoba's highest court rejected a defence motion yesterday that would have further delayed the start of Monique Turenne's appeal of the extradition order, set for next week.

Turenne has denied any role in the murder of her husband, Canadian air force Maj. David Turenne, who was found beaten to death in the driveway of their Panama City, Fla. bungalow on Feb. 9, 1996. Turenne was ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba's Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999. Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both Manitoba Court of Appeal and then-federal justice minister Anne McLellan. Former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order in March 2003.

Her defence lawyer, Greg Brodsky, has been refused access to documents pertaining to the police investigation of Turenne's death and communication between the Manitoba, Canadian and American governments. The motion turned down yesterday was for access to the documents. They are important because Brodsky believes they played a role in the murder conviction of another man in the killing.

Ralph Crompton, who was described as Turenne's lover, is serving life in prison for first-degree murder.

Turenne's appeal is to be heard May 26-28.


Court denies release of papers in Turenne case
Defence lawyer calls it a setback

A Court of Appeal ruling yesterday that denied a defence motion to release key documents in the Monique Turenne case is a definite setback, her lawyer said yesterday.

Turenne is a Winnipeg woman awaiting extradition to Florida on charges she murdered her husband in 1996.

Defence lawyer Greg Brodsky said he will now have to argue for the release of documents denied in the motion during the main appeal of her extradition.

"Now we'll have to set a date in the Court of Appeal to have the appeal heard," Brodsky said.

Turenne is expected to remain in Winnipeg while her case makes its way through the province's highest court.

Turenne has denied any role in the murder of her husband, Canadian air force Maj. David Turenne, who was found beaten to death in the driveway of their Panama City, Fla. bungalow on Feb. 9, 1996.

Turenne was ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba's Court of Queen's Bench in October, 1999.

Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both Manitoba Court of Appeal and then-federal justice minister Anne McLellan.

Former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order last March.

Her defence lawyer countered by vowing to appeal her extradition.

Brodsky also charged the appeal process had been derailed by interference from the Canadian government. He said he has been refused access to documents pertaining to the police investigation of Turenne's death and communication between the Manitoba, Canadian and American governments.

The motion turned down yesterday was for access to the documents.

They are important because Brodsky believes they played a role in the murder conviction of another man in the killing.

Ralph Crompton, a retired U.S. air force master sergeant who was described as Turenne's lover, is serving life in prison for first-degree murder in the Canadian officer's death.

Brodsky said Turenne is willing to face charges in her husband's death but she wants to be tried under Canadian, not Florida, law.

"We're not trying to avoid her being tried. We think she should be tried here and if Florida doesn't want to say to the (federal justice) minister here is the case we have against her, we think that is all the more reason to be suspicious," he said.


Court rules against woman facing U.S. murder charge

WINNIPEG - A Winnipeg woman has lost another court battle in her attempt to avoid extradition to the United States on a murder charge.

Monique Turenne has been ordered to stand trial in Florida for the death of her husband, David, who was killed outside the couple's Florida home in 1996.

David Turenne was on a military exchange in the U.S. when he was killed. Last spring, the federal justice minister ruled Monique Turenne could be extradited to face charges in her husband's death.

Monique Turenne had gone to court to get access to the information used by the minister to make his ruling, but the Manitoba Court of Appeal has denied her that.

Turenne will still file an appeal without the information.

Ralph Compton is already serving time for the killing of David Turenne. Compton claims he and Monique Turenne were lovers and she helped plan the killing.

Turenne denies both claims.


Legal knots tie up Turenne case
Woman awaits extradition to U.S.

THE seemingly never-ending case of a Winnipeg woman awaiting extradition to Florida on charges she murdered her husband in 1996 has been delayed again in a Manitoba courtroom.

Lawyers for Monique Turenne argued a motion yesterday before the Court of Appeal, claiming the federal Justice Department has repeatedly refused to hand over key documents involving an appeal of her case.

They claim the appeal can't properly be made until they receive the material that Canada's justice minister used to sign off on an extradition order.

The province's highest court reserved its decision and gave no indication of when it would be ready.

Turenne has denied any role in the murder of her husband, Canadian air force Maj. David Turenne, who was found beaten to death in the driveway of their Panama City, Fla., bungalow on Feb. 9, 1996.

Turenne was ordered extradited to Florida by Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench in October 1999. Her lawyers immediately appealed the decision to both Manitoba Court of Appeal and then-federal justice minister Anne McLellan.

Former justice minister Martin Cauchon finally signed the extradition order last March.

Appeal

Turenne's lawyers said they would move immediately to appeal both Cauchon's decision and the original extradition order to Manitoba Court of Appeal.

But defence lawyer Greg Brodsky said the appeal process has been derailed by interference from the Canadian government.

He has been refused access to certain documents pertaining to the police investigation of Turenne's death and communication between the Manitoba, Canadian and American governments, according to his motion.

Brodsky says the federal Justice Department should have assumed jurisdiction for the case because the victim was a member of the Canadian military and because his wife was charged with the crime. He demanded Turenne be tried in Canada, an assertion Cauchon rejected.