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Sebastian Burns and Atif Rafay Sebastian Burns and Atif Rafay: The heartbreaking story of two bright Canadians who were traded to the U.S. by malicious cops to advance their careers. This "Mr Big" undercover operation is a disgrace to the democratic world. RCMP undercover operators Haslett and Shinkaruk have boasted that using the Mr. Big or some other scenario, the cops can get anyone to "confess". Posing as thugs, the two lured Burns into a phony criminal enterprise. Eventually, they extracted a pair of halting, reluctant confessions.

Monique Turenne A Winnipeg woman, Monique Turenne, was found guilty of second-degree murder for helping her alleged former lover, convicted murderer Ralph Crompton, fatally bludgeon her husband, a Canadian air force officer serving in Florida. Much controversy with alleged perjured/forged affidavits by Winnipeg Police and an alleged frame-up surround this case. The most thorough investigation is A Soldier's Murder.

Paul Bernardo Just before Christmas, 2001, when no one was paying attention, the infamous videotapes depicting sex killer Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka's vicious rape and torture of schoolgirls Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy were incinerated by court order. Future historians will have to speculate about just how demented Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka really were. An exercise kind of like speculating on how awful Auschwitz was. Except to holocaust deniers like Ernst Zundel, we can point to the evidence.

David Milgaard David Milgaard: The partly clad body of nursing aide Gail Miller, 20, is found in a Saskatoon snowbank. 1970: Milgaard is sentenced to life in prison for murder. 1992: The Supreme Court of Canada recommends a new trial after hearing evidence of a series of rapes committed in Saskatoon by RCMP snitch Larry Fisher who had already been convicted of four rapes and one attempted rape. Fisher was convicted in 1999 and sentenced to life in prison. David Milgaard was set free in 1992 and exonerated in 1997 following DNA tests. Gets $10M

Jason Dix Jason Dix was entrapped by an RCMP "Mr. Big" sting. He spent nearly two years in jail on murder charges that were later dismissed. Dix won a lawsuit, $756K, against the RCMP and Crown lawyers for malicious prosecution, false imprisonment and breach of rights. Justice Keith Ritter wrote "The defendants [police, prosecutor] are, quite simply, legally cloaked in malice" using tactics the judge called "dangerous", "deplorable" and "reprehensible".

John Patrick McCreary John Patrick McCreary: was convicted, in a second trial, of murdering his cousin and her boyfriend, and sentenced to life in prison without parole for 25 years. At least two jurors with concerns about "reasonable doubt" led to a hung jury in the first trial. Jefferson Circuit Judge Steve Mershon rejected claims from McCreary's family that a 911 emergency call recording exonerates him. During the trial, a 911 operator said she heard the dying victim identify McCreary as the shooter by name and by saying "my cousin". His family maintains that when the 911 recording is played at a slower speed, the victim actually names another cousin.

Brenton Butler Brenton Butler: "Murder on a Sunday Morning", the winner for Best Documentary at the 2002 Academy Award ceremony, premiered on HBO. It recounts the trial of Brenton Butler, a 15-year-old Jacksonville resident who had been falsely accused of murdering a white tourist during a robbery. He had no gunshot residue on his hands. His fingerprints were not on the woman's purse which was stolen during the shooting. The $91 he had on him was from honest work at Burger King. Butler testified that police detectives beat a confession out of him. Settles for $775K.

Dominic McCullock Jaime Wheeler, 20, was murdered in her basement suite on March 12, 2000, stabbed and slashed 56 times. Dominic McCullock, 23, was convicted in 2004 of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison with no eligibility for parole for 15 years. He has maintained his innocence and is appealing his conviction. The trial heard that DNA found in blood on Wheeler's jacket and apartment door handles matched McCullock's, and a pubic hair stuck in dried blood on Wheeler's arm matched his.

Clayton Johnson Clayton Johnson: Janice Johnson, 36, is found with fatal head injuries at the bottom of the basement stairs in her Shelburne, N.S. home. 1993-2001: Clayton Johnson, her husband, is convicted of bludgeoning her to death. A Texas pathologist who reviewed the original findings determined the woman died accidentally when she fell down the stairs backwards and struck her head. The federal justice minister refered this case to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal which ordered a new murder trial for Clayton Johnson. Gets $2.5M

Holly Jones' killer Michael Briere Michael Brier: was accused, in 2003, with the first-degree murder of 10-year-old Holly Jones. Briere, 35, a software developer, was arrested at his apartment, just steps from the spot where Holly Jones was last seen. Her dismembered body was found in Lake Ontario hours after she was abducted from her west-end Toronto neighbourhood. 'Forty days of investigative work: That's what did it'

Theresa Olson Theresa Olson: public defender for Sebastian Burns was suspended for two years after a jail-sex romp. Two justices dissented, arguing that the suspension was too harsh in part because there was "no evidence" sexual relations had occurred - citing a dictionary definition of "coitus" which refers only to male-female vaginal intercourse - even though guards outside a jail conference room claimed, under oath, they had seen her having sex with her client. In 2003, the Supreme Court rejected the bar's recommendation for a one-year suspension. In addition, Olson must undergo a psychological evaluation before she can be reinstated.

Michael Cardamone Michael Cardamone: is charged in 2002 with molesting young girls at his family's gym. At pretrial, a psychologist testifies his case is an example of children developing false memories through "suggestive" interviews but the testimony is not admitted at trial. Judge says he is "a systematic and serial child molester". Gets 20 years. In 2008 a Court overturns the conviction and orders a new trial. He gets a $55K bail. In 2012, in a case started for sexual abuse, both sides agree to "inappropriately touching, not sexually motivated". He takes a plea and gets time served.

Scott Hornoff Scott Hornoff, ex Rhode Island cop, experienced both sides of the fence. If Rhode Island had the death penalty he would have been on it. Instead he was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Victoria Cushman. After six years, four months and eighteen days (on November 6, 2002) he was freed when the one responsible, filled with remorse and hauntings, came forward and confessed. "If it could happen to me - a white, upper-middle class, 40-year-old cop, it can happen to you". He now speaks out about judicial system.

Guy Paul Morin Guy-Paul Morin: The body of Christine Jessop, 9, is found in a farmer's field. 1985-92: Morin is arrested, tried, acquitted, tried again and convicted of murder by a prosecutor now a judge. 1995: He is cleared and offered $1.25M compensation after DNA testing excludes him as the source of semen found on the child's underwear. An inquiry slams the investigation. The final report says mistakes by forensic scientists, police, and prosecutors all combined to send an innocent man to jail. He is the best known wrongly convicted exonerated person in Canada.

Shannon Murrin Shannon Murrin: Mindy Tran disappeared on August 17, 1994. A lead RCMP investigator had Shannon Murrin brutally beaten up by thugs in 1995. He was charged with her rape and murder in January 1997 and acquitted by a jury in January 2000. A juror, later Murrin's girlfriend, wrote a story of what "really happened" and accused the media and RCMP of having him convicted before the trial began. The Mindy Tran website writes: "Her's is a well crafted tale transforming Murrin from a monstrous child killer into the lovable falsely accused rogue".

John Schneeberger John Schneeberger has lost his Canadian citizenship. He is on parole after being convicted for drugging and sexually-assaulting two female patients in 1999. In 2003 a movie was made, "I Accuse", based on the crimes of Dr. John Schneeberger. He was deported to his South African homeland where he applied to the Health Professions Council.

Barbara Stoppel The Mikolajewski Report exposes the shoddy work done on the Barbara Stoppel murder investigation and how Chief Jack Ewatski helped block a proper re-investigation to protect retired inspector Ken Bieners and the secrets a warranted search of his premises would reveal. Thomas Sophonow spent four years in jail for murder and went through three trials after guilty verdicts were overturned on appeal. He was exonerated in June 2000.

Robert Mailman Robert Mailman and Walter Gillespie were sentenced to life largely on testimony of a 16-year old who now admits he lied, claiming pressure by police and was paid "living allowance" in the weeks leading to the trial. A second witness agreed to testify against them after the murder charge against her was dropped on the eve of trial. The first trial ended in a hung jury. Both had an alibi putting them elsewhere around the time the victim was killed. Information favourable to the accused was not disclosed. Detectives admit acting only on "suspicion" and had no "concrete" evidence. A senior detective who worked closely on the case says other detectives were "a little bit overzealous".

Cory Patterson Cory Patterson a.k.a. Cory Joseph Segato: This is a story the Mounties don't want told. He was a career criminal, an outlaw who tried his hand at everything. Extortion, insurance fraud - all the moneymakers. He pimped in a prostitution ring, sold drugs and ran small shipments of guns across the U.S. border. And he was their agent to whom they paid thousands. First coded as a source in November 1990, Patterson would be interviewed several times before signing his first undercover contract with the RCMP. The Mounties offered him a salary and expense-account living to keep him on their team.


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