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THE TOP TEN LIST - What others were reading in APRIL 2016

Scott Hornoff Scott Hornoff, ex Rhode Island cop, experienced both sides of the fence. If Rhode Island had the death penalty he would have been on it. Instead he was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Victoria Cushman. After six years, four months and eighteen days (on November 6, 2002) he was freed when the one responsible, filled with remorse and hauntings, came forward and confessed. "If it could happen to me - a white, upper-middle class, 40-year-old cop, it can happen to you". He now speaks out about judicial system.


Karla Homolka Just before Christmas, 2001, when no one was paying attention, the infamous videotapes depicting sex killer Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka's vicious rape and torture of schoolgirls Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffy were incinerated by court order. Future historians will have to speculate about just how demented Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka really were. An exercise kind of like speculating on how awful Auschwitz was. Except to holocaust deniers like Ernst Zundel, we can point to the evidence.


Chris McCullough Chris McCullough spent nine years behind bars for the murder of school teacher Beverley Perrin. As a result of fresh DNA evidence the Court of Appeal overturned his second-degree murder conviction in 2000 and unanimously ordered a new trial. Six months later the murder charge was withdrawn raising questions about the performance of Ontario's chief crime lab.


Brenton Butler Brenton Butler: "Murder on a Sunday Morning", the winner for Best Documentary at the 2002 Academy Award ceremony, premiered on HBO. It recounts the trial of Brenton Butler, a 15-year-old Jacksonville resident who had been falsely accused of murdering a white tourist during a robbery. He had no gunshot residue on his hands. His fingerprints were not on the woman's purse which was stolen during the shooting. The $91 he had on him was from honest work at Burger King. Butler testified that police detectives beat a confession out of him. Settles for $775K.


John Schneeberger John Schneeberger has lost his Canadian citizenship. He is on parole after being convicted for drugging and sexually-assaulting two female patients in 1999. In 2003 a movie was made, "I Accuse", based on the crimes of Dr. John Schneeberger. He was deported to his South African homeland where he applied to the Health Professions Council.


Dominic McCullock Jaime Wheeler, 20, was murdered in her basement suite on March 12, 2000. She had been stabbed and slashed 56 times. Dominic McCullock, 23, was convicted in 2004 of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison with no eligibility for parole for 15 years. He has maintained his innocence and is appealing his conviction. The trial heard that DNA found in blood on Wheeler's jacket and apartment door handles matched McCullock's, and a pubic hair stuck in dried blood on Wheeler's arm matched McCullock's.


Clayton Johnson Clayton Johnson: Janice Johnson, 36, is found with fatal head injuries at the bottom of the basement stairs in her Shelburne, N.S. home. 1993-2001: Clayton Johnson, her husband, is convicted of bludgeoning her to death. A Texas pathologist who reviewed the original findings determined the woman died accidentally when she fell down the stairs backwards and struck her head. The federal justice minister, refered this case to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal which ordered a new murder trial for Clayton Johnson.
Gets $2.5M


Guy Paul Morin Guy-Paul Morin: The body of Christine Jessop, 9, is found in a farmer's field. 1985-92: Mr. Morin is arrested, tried, acquitted, tried again and convicted of murder by a prosecutor who is now a judge. 1995: He is cleared and offered compensation of $1.25M after DNA testing excludes him as the source of semen found on the child's underwear. An inquiry slams the investigation. The final report says mistakes by forensic scientists, police and prosecutors all combined to send an innocent man to jail. Morin is the best known wrongly convicted person exonerated in Canada.


This page made the Top Ten List



John Patrick McCreary John Patrick McCreary: was convicted, in a second trial, of murdering his cousin and her boyfriend, and sentenced to life in prison without parole for 25 years. At least two jurors with concerns about "reasonable doubt" led to a hung jury in the first trial. Jefferson Circuit Judge Steve Mershon rejected claims from McCreary's family that a 911 emergency call recording exonerates him. During the trial, a 911 operator said she heard the dying victim identify McCreary as the shooter by name and by saying "my cousin". His family maintains that when the 911 recording is played at a slower speed, the victim actually names another cousin.


HONOURABLE MENTIONS

Dean Edmondson Tisdale Rape story: Three white men from Tisdale, Dean Trevor Edmondson, Jeffrey Kindrat, and Jeffrey Brown, are accused of sexually assaulting a 12-year-old Cree girl. Edmondson was convicted and sentenced to two years less a day of house arrest but the others were acquitted by a Melfort jury. In 2005 the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal upheld Edmondson's conviction.


Greg Parsons Greg Parsons: Catherine Carroll is killed in her St. John's Newfoundland home in 1991. Greg Parsons, her son, is convicted of murder in 1994. Parsons was exonerated by DNA evidence and formally acquitted in 1998. A childhood friend of Gregory Parsons, Brian Doyle, was later charged with murder. Doyle was sentenced to life in prison. Gregory Parsons gets a compensation of $1.3M


Matti Baranovski [Dimitry] Matti Baranovski, 15 was kicked to death in 1999. 19-year-old Israeli soldier, Daniel Weiz, was arrested and charged with second-degree murder. A jury found him not guilty. He left for his native Israel two weeks after he was exonerated. In 2004 he came back to clear his name and launched a $9M lawsuit against the two investigating detectives -- alleging "Tunnel Vision" and that he was wrongly charged. "I'm not that killer they read about"


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